News & Current Affairs

July 5, 2009

Madonna in Jackson stage tribute

Filed under: Entertainment News, Latest — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — expressyoureself @ 7:59 am

Madonna in Jackson stage tribute

Madonna kicked-off her revamped Sticky And Sweet tour at London’s O2 Arena with a tribute to Michael Jackson.

Jackson, who died last week, was due to perform a series of 50 farewell concerts at the venue from 13 July.

As Madonna sang Holiday she was joined by a dancer dressed in Jackson’s unmistakable style of sequined jacket and sparkling white glove.

Madonna told the crowd: “Give it up for one of the greatest artists the world has ever known – long live the King!”

Signature moves

Pictures of Jackson as a boy flashed up on a giant screen as the dancer moon-walked across the stage to the strains of Billie Jean.

He went on to perform some of Jackson’s signature moves to Wanna Be Starting Something.

An estimated crowd of 17,000 watched Madonna perform at the first of two concerts in London this weekend.

She moves on to Manchester on Tuesday, followed by several dates across Europe.

Madonna closed the show with Give It 2 Me, and donned a jewelled glove, along with her dancers, in a final, simple, tribute to Jackson.

Solo stars

Lyrics from his hit Man In the Mirror scrolled across the screens. It read: “If you want to make the world a better place, take a look at yourself and then make the change.”

Michael Jackson and Madonna montage

Jackson and Madonna both became huge solo stars in the 1980s

The tribute, albeit brief, impressed fans at the O2. Victoria Mears, of Billericay, Essex, said: “I really liked it. It seemed very fitting for the queen of pop to pay tribute to the king of pop.”

Nina Lawrence, 32, of Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire, said: “It thought it was good, but it was a shame she didn’t sing one of his songs as a tribute.”

And Helen Levy, 30, of Winchester, Hants, said: “She seemed very passionate when she spoke about Michael Jackson. It’s clear that he was a great inspiration to her.”

Jackson and Madonna both became huge solo stars in the 1980s.

Speaking after the 50-year-old’s death on 25 June, Madonna said: “I can’t stop crying over the sad news.

“I’ve always admired Michael Jackson – the world has lost one of its greats, but his music will live on forever.”

A public memorial service for Jackson will be held at the Staples Center in Los Angeles on Tuesday.

Over half-a-million fans have applied for just 17,500 tickets available for the event.

August 13, 2008

Palestinians say farewell to poet

Palestinians say farewell to poet

Palestinians are lining the streets of Ramallah, on the West Bank, for the funeral of poet Mahmoud Darwish.

Leading mourners, Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas described the poet and author as a hero for all Palestinians.

Darwish was one of the most influential cultural figures in recent Arab history, encapsulating the Palestinian longing for independence.

He died after open-heart surgery in Houston, Texas, on Saturday at the age of 67.

The ceremonies in Ramallah are expected to be the biggest funeral in the West Bank since that of Yasser Arafat in 2004.

Darwish’s body was flown back from the US to Amman, Jordan, on Wednesday where an honor guard saluted as Palestinian Liberation Army officers carried the flag-draped coffin from the plane.

Military helicopter

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin Nayef attended the ceremony on behalf of King Abdullah.

The coffin was then taken by military helicopter to the government compound of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, in Ramallah.

Mr Abbas led mourners and read a eulogy to the poet.

Afterwards, the coffin was to be taken in procession to Darwish’s grave near the Palace of Culture about 4km (2.5 miles) away.

Mahmoud Darwish

Darwish won many international prizes for his work

People of all backgrounds in the West Bank feel they had a personal connection to the poet and take pride in a man who told their story in a way they could not.

Darwish was a national icon, whose work was often based on his experiences of life in exile and under occupation.

“He symbolizes the Palestinian memory,” one Palestinian mourner.

“He intended to convey a message: in the end we are all human beings and we have to work collectively for the sake of humanity.”

Thousands would flock to his recitals. His poems were transformed into popular songs and used in political speeches, and the words he wrote now form part of Palestinian daily life, our correspondent says.

Fierce criticism

Nor was he shy of talking of his people’s shortcomings.

Darwish penned fierce criticism of the divisions among Palestinians, believing, in some ways, what they were doing to themselves was worse than anything others had done to them.

He also penned the famous speech Arafat delivered at the United Nations in 1974: “Today I have come bearing an olive branch and a freedom-fighter’s gun. Do not let the olive branch fall from my hand.”

There is little doubt his work, not just on the Palestinian cause, but on love and hope and death, will endure across the Arab world, our correspondent says.


How will you remember Mahmoud Darwish? Will you attend a commemoration service?

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